Health Voices Category: Uncategorized

PHABC takes a position on poverty and inequity

May 24 2014 | New PHABC Statement on Poverty and Inequity PHABC’s Board of Directors has approved a new position on Poverty and Inequity. PHABC’s Vice President Dr. John Millar who was instrumental in conducting the research and writing the position statement in conjunction with the PHABC Policy Advocacy and Research Committee said “this statement expands…

I say Epidemic – You say Fear Mongering

By Ted Bruce Debates on public health issues are a staple of life. Unfortunately, they often involve a false dichotomy. Those promoting individual choice argue that public health advocates are “no fun” trying to create a “nanny state” by banning all those tasty treats and indulgences like cheap happy hours and supersized pop. On the…

A Campaign for a Treaty on Global Health Equity

By Jalil Safaei The discourse on health equity and social determinants of health received international attention when the World Health Organizations’ (WHO) released the final report by its Commission on Social Determinants of Health in 2008 with the bold warning in its opening remarks that “Social injustice kills people on a grand scale.” (WHO Commission on Social Determinants of Health…

Speaking Out On Inequities

By Ted Bruce The health care establishment occasionally shows glimmers of awareness that the greatest contributors to health are social determinants. We even see the Canadian Medical Association speaking out about poverty in its report What Makes Us Sick. But we still have a long way to go in debunking the notion that health is all about…

The fight for democracy is a public health fight too

By Dr. Trevor Hancock A couple of weeks ago I was in Manchester for the International Conference on Urban Health, and spent a couple of hours at the People’s History Museum. Manchester is such an interesting city, because it was the first industrial city, and it has a powerful history of social and political reform. Perhaps most dramatically…

An emphasis on a ‘comprehensive’ approach

By Ted Bruce As a public health professional, I normally argue that mixed neighbourhoods where low income people live side by side with higher income people is a good thing. There is evidence to support this such as the findings published by the late Dr. Clyde Hertzman of UBC. He points out that “segregated neighbourhoods are at…