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Online Professional Development courses – Register now for September 2017

Explore what the Population Health Data Analysis Certificate (PHDA) can do for your career

Designed for health or social sciences professionals, the PHDA provides an excellent opportunity to revitalize your career, earn professional development credits* or get started in a rapidly diversifying field.
This unique program offers:

* A flexible, fully online format
* A diverse set of analytic courses
* *Applied Pro D training

Apply for the PHDA program or take up to two stand-alone courses listed below for professional development.

Want to develop and conduct your own project evaluation?

PHDA 06 Health Services Program Monitoring and Evaluation 

* Develop your own plan
* Differentiate monitoring and evaluation approaches and uses and identify considerations that influence the choice of approach
* Learn the role of theory in monitoring and evaluation and identify a theoretical basis for your plan
* Apply evaluation competencies and standards and appreciate ethical considerations throughout the monitoring and evaluation process
Interested in developing skills in the use of administrative data?

PHDA 01 Working with Administrative Data  

* Learn how admin data is used for research
* Develop a data dictionary for your data set
* Gain basic analytical skills using ‘real-world’ health data

Looking to understand the relationship between place and health?

PHDA 03 Population Health and Geographic Information Systems  

* Explore working with geographic data
* Learn analytic techniques for disease mapping, assessing population exposure to environmental pollutants, and measuring population access to health care services
* Practice hands-on skills using ‘real-world’ data

These fully online, non-credit courses are offered as a partnership between Population Data BC, the University of Victoria, Division of Continuing Studies and the Department of Geography.

Note: Registration is open until August 18th, subject to availability. Please review program eligibility requirements prior to applying.
*The skills acquired in PHDA courses align with the Public Health Agency of Canada’s Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals and are eligible for 10 Professional Development (CPE) credits with CHIMA and CIPHI.

For More information or to apply contact:

Maxine Reitsma, Program Coordinator UVic Continuing Studies
Phone: 250-721-8481
Email: phda@uvic.ca

To leave, manage or join list: https://listserv.yorku.ca/cgi-bin/wa?SUBED1=sdoh&A=1

 

Summer School 2017: Planetary Health – Healthy Built Environments

Facing a Changing World:

Transformative Leadership and Practice

 

Summer School 2017

 

 

The Public Health Association of BC’s 8th annual summer school is only a few days away. During the two day course we will show registrants, through four topic areas, how they can operationalize Transformative Leadership into practice and create innovative changes in the field of Public Health and beyond.

Over the next week we will be posting feature blogs of each topic session to give registrants and those who are on the fence an idea of what we will be talking about. We continue today with Planetary Health – Healthy Built Environments.

Registrations for summer school are open now and seats are limited! Click here to register!

 

Planetary Health – Healthy Built Environments

 

Did you know that high-income countries are 80 – 90% urbanized and that we spend 90% of our time indoors? The built environment is by far the most common environment for humans in the 21st century, so it should be health-enhancing. Simultaneously, we also spend 100% of our time living within the natural ecosystems which are ultimately determinants of our health. It’s not a long shot to say that both the built and natural environments are of vital concern. Yet in recent decades, we have not been doing the best job at creating healthy environments. It’s clear that we need to transform the way we live within and manage these environments in the 21st century. In the upcoming 2017 PHABC Summer School, Victoria Barr, Shannon Clarke and Trevor Hancock will be exploring three innovative BC-based approaches to managing the built environment in holistic ways that will create better health and greater ecological sustainability.

 

Spear-headed by Victoria Barr, the Plan H program recognizes that for maximum impact in our communities, strong partnerships between public health professionals and other sectors need to be made. The program supports the collective work of local governments, public health staff, and other community partners. Through sharing learning opportunities, resources and leading-edge practices for collaborative local action, Plan H supports local government engagement and partnerships across sectors for creating healthier communities. Victoria Barr, a Project Manager for BC Healthy communities, brings over 20 years of expertise as a population health planner, researcher, and healthy communities advocate. She will introduce the Plan H program, with a special emphasis on how the program might integrate an equity lens.

 

The field of Public health faces a major challenge. How can we measure progess towards health? How can we track our wellbeing outcomes to prove that a policy, program or service can and will keep someone healthy and well? While the answer isn’t always black and white, ample research has demonstrated that there are social determinants of health that impact our wellbeing. If we can measure social determinants, we should be able to track health successes, as well as the areas in need of greater collaborative action. Shannon Clarke is a Healthy Communities Planner at the Capital Regional District, is on the Board of Directors for the Public Health Association of BC and is the coordinator and chair of the Regional Outcomes Monitoring Collaborative of the Capital Region. Join Shannon as she speaks on the processes that the Regional Outcomes Monitoring (ROM) Collaborative undergo, and how as a multi-agency stakeholder group, the ROM Collaborative is engaging with community agencies to identify desired outcomes for social determinants of health.

 

Humans have now become a force of nature powerful enough to disrupt natural systems locally and globally. We live as if we have more than one planet, and now face the challenge of changing our ways to become environmentally sustainable. So the question remains, how do we reduce our ecological footprint by 70 – 80%, to the equivalent of one planet, while still maintaining good health and a high quality life? Dr. Trevor Hock, an internationally recognized health promotion consultant and an expert on healthy cities and communities explores this challenge by bringing together the concepts of Healthy Communities and Sustainable Communities, and people from different sectors to engage in a dialogue called Conversations for a One Planet Region. Leading this project since January, Dr. Trevor Hancock will be speaking on the issues, process and plans for next steps. Join him, and his thought-provoking discussions how to make the Victoria region a ‘One Planet’ region

Summer School 2017: Immigrant and Refugee Health

Facing a Changing World:

Transformative Leadership and Practice

 

Summer School 2017

 

 

The Public Health Association of BC’s 8th annual summer school is only a few days away. During the two day course we will show registrants, through four topic areas, how they can operationalize Transformative Leadership into practice and create innovative changes in the field of Public Health and beyond.

Over the next week we will be posting feature blogs of each topic session to give registrants and those who are on the fence an idea of what we will be talking about. We continue today with Immigrant and Refugee health.

Registrations for summer school are open now and seats are limited! Click here to register!

 

Immigrant and Refugee Health

 

Currently, in Canada, almost two-thirds of population expansion can be attributed to immigration (Statistics Canada, 2013). Our immigrant population has grown and continues to grow rapidly to the point that we now have the highest proportion of foreign-born citizens (nearly 21%) among the G8 countries (ibid.). The country of birth of Canadian immigrants, however, has changed significantly. Up until the 1950s, most immigrants to Canada were of European origin, since the late 1990’s this trend has shifted to visible minorities (Hyman, 2001). In particular, findings from the 2011 National Household Survey indicate that Asia (including the Middle East) is the region from which the largest proportion of individuals have immigrated. The share of immigrants from Africa, the Caribbean, and Central and South America has also increased slightly. According to the most recent report from Statistics Canada (2013), nearly 70% of the visible minority population in Canada is now foreign-born.

 

The increasing diversity of Canada’s immigrant and refugee populations raises important concerns regarding the health-related needs of these populations, particularly in the context of the challenges posed by the social, economic, geographical, cultural and environmental factors that accompany the process of migration. The health of immigrants and their families has important implications for the future health profile of the nation. Of significant importance is the need for policy makers and other key stakeholders to address complex and intricate questions on immigrant and refugee health, such as: what are the determinants of immigrant health? What additional challenges are factors in the determinants of refugee health? What are the barriers to the uptake of health promotion practices among immigrants and refugees? How can we optimize the uptake of health promotion practices among these populations? What resources are available to support immigrant and refugee health and settlement?

 

Dr. Karen Kobayashi and Sara Hosseina will use the social determinants of health approach to respond to these questions at the 2017 Summer School. Dr. Kobayashi is an Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology and a Research Affiliate at the Institute for Aging and Lifelong Health at the University of Victoria. She is a social gerontologist who uses a life course perspective to explore the intersections of structural, cultural, and individual factors/experiences affecting health and aging in the Canadian population. Sara Hosseina is a Family Nurse Practitioner at the New Canadian Clinic (NCC), which provides primary care to refugees and new immigrants in Surrey and Burnaby. Sara not only provides primary care to this population, but she also has a strong focus on the barriers-to-transition that newcomers face in their first couple of years in Canada, particularly after fleeing war zone countries.

 

After painting a picture of the current status of, and challenges imposed upon Canada’s immigrant and refugee populations, our two presenters will host discussions on “promising practices” in health promotion. Through case studies they will also provide insights into how discourses and techniques such as social marketing, working with the mass and social media, and collaborative processes such as community capacity-building, may be effectively used in order to optimize the uptake of health promotion practices among immigrants and refugees, and, ideally, ensure better health for all.

 

 

Join us at the 2017 Summer School to learn more!

Summer School 2017: Child and Youth Health

Facing a Changing World:

Transformative Leadership and Practice

 

Summer School 2017

 

 

The Public Health Association of BC’s 8th annual summer school is only a few days away. During the two day course we will show registrants, through four topic areas, how they can operationalize Transformative Leadership into practice and create innovative changes in the field of Public Health and beyond.

Over the next week we will be posting feature blogs of each topic session to give registrants and those who are on the fence an idea of what we will be talking about. We continue today with Child and Youth Health.

Registrations for summer school are open now and seats are limited! Click here to register!

 

Child and Youth Health

It is estimated that 10-20% of children and youth in Canada are affected by mental illness, and 3.2 million youth between the ages of 12 and 19 are at risk for developing depression (CMHA, 2017). The causes for such mental health issues are multifactorial, but socially innovative approaches offer promising results for mental illness prevention in Canada’s youth. At the 2017 Summer School, Dr. Gordie Hogg, Dr. Gord Miller and Ashley Frerichs will present work they have been involved in related to meaningful collaboration and engagement of children and youth in the examination of relevant issues.

 

Dr. Gordie Hogg is a recently retired Canadian politician who, among many other distinguished roles in government, has served as the BC Liberal Member of the Legislative Assembly (since 1997) and as the Minister of Children and Family Development. Prior to his election to the Legislative Assembly Gordie was a counsellor, probation officer and regional director for corrections. After completing his BA in sociology and psychology, and his master’s degree in psychology, Gordie completed his PhD in Public Policy Development in 2015 and was appointed SFU Adjunct Professor in criminology in 2016. He served on the White Rock city council for 20 years, for 10 of which he was mayor. He has been a board member on more than 15 committees and non-profit societies, including the Peace Arch Community Health Council and Peace Arch Hospital. Gordie has also been a foster parent and Little League coach.

 

Dr. Gord Miller is an adjunct professor within the University of Victoria School of Child and Youth Care, and he is a former Research Officer and Senior Policy Analyst with the Ministry of Health, and the Ministry for Children and Family Development. He has been involved in the provincial development and implementation of: Healthy Workplaces; Healthy Schools; Healthy Communities; Health Impact Assessment (HIA); Provincial Health Goals; Youth Agreements; Agreements with Youth Adults; Youth Safe House Standards; Child, Family and Community Services Act; and, Youth Policy Framework. Gord’s current research, as a Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada Research Fellow, centers around understanding how programs, organizations, and communities affect children and youth health, well-being and development. Gord is a recipient of the 2014 ‘Premier’s Award for Innovation’ for his work in the area of Youth Engagement and Collaborative Action Research within the Ministry of Children and Family Development.

 

Ashley Frerichs is a recent graduate of the University of Victoria after completing her bachelor’s degree in Child and Youth Care. Ashley began in the field as a youth co-researcher working on a youth engagement strategy and has since worked as a youth employment counselor, a drop-in centre coordinator and – most recently – a Youth Outreach Worker. She is also a member of the Provincial Director of Child Welfare Youth Advisory Council. Ashley currently works in Parksville supporting the young people of her community.

 

If you haven’t already, register for the 2017 Summer School now, where social innovation and policy creation approaches will be explored in relation to our most vulnerable young people.

Summer School 2017: Indigenous Health and Transformative Leadership

Facing a Changing World:

Transformative Leadership and Practice

 

Summer School 2017

 

 

The Public Health Association of BC’s 8th annual summer school is only a week away. During the two day course we will show registrants, through four topic areas, how they can operationalize Transformative Leadership into practice and create innovative changes in the field of Public Health and beyond.

Over the next week we will be posting feature blogs of each topic session to give registrants and those who are on the fence an idea of what we will be talking about. We begin today with Indigenous Health and what the team at Vancouver Coastal Health are doing to enact transformative change throughout the province.

Registrations for summer school are open now and seats are limited! Click here to register!

 

Indigenous Health and Transformative Leadership

 

Indigenous people throughout BC continue to face barriers, including racial discrimination, when accessing health services in all areas of the system and in both urban and rural settings. As a part of the 2017 Summer School curriculum Leslie Bonshor, of the Tzeachten First Nation, identifies why transformative change is pertinent for improving Indigenous Health and how the conditions for such change are promising in the context of the  Truth & Reconciliation Commission 94 Calls to Action and the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples Internationally.

 

Leslie leads the Vancouver Coastal Health Aboriginal Health Team, within the larger VCH system, to support and facilitate system-wide transformative change for the Indigenous Peoples of the Vancouver Coastal Region. Such transformative change is facilitated by a team of Indigenous health leaders who act as agents of change throughout the greater Public Health system. The team provides education and leadership to health professionals in order to reform services to be more culturally sensitive and responsive, and they encourage the development of concrete goals in a movement towards addressing the TRC’s 94 Calls to Action.

 

Through the view that all health departments and professionals have a role in improving Indigenous health and a responsibility to participate in the reconciliation movement in Canada, the VCH Aboriginal Health Team focuses on empowering non-Indigenous health providers to learn about Indigenous colonial history and move towards offering culturally sensitive care as allies themselves. Having allies throughout the health system helps the spread of social change and thus helps to meet the reconciliation and cultural safety goals established by the health authority.

 

Indigenous health work is, by definition, transformative. This transformative leadership must have an impact at all levels of a system from the ground up. Until an entire system has reached a common level of understanding on the complexity of determinants that impact Indigenous people’s health and their interaction with health services, we can not make an impact on bridging the health gap for this population or achieve the health reconciliation calls outlined in the TRC.

 

Join us at the 2017 Summer School so you too can learn your role in transforming Indigenous health.

Summer School 2017: Final Agenda Released

PHABC’s Summer School 2017

Facing a Changing World:

Transformative Leadership and Practice

 

With just over a week to go before our annual summer school we are delighted to share with you our agenda for both days. We are excited to bring together experts and innovators from all over BC to discuss this important leadership style and how registrants can apply the theory in their work and personal lives to effect positive changes in their communities.

If you haven’t registered be sure to do so soon, seats are filling up! Click here to register

 

Room Locations

UBC: Life Sciences Building (LSC) 1002 LT2

UVic: Medical Services Building (MSB) 160 LT

UBCO: Reichwald Health Sciences Centre (RHS) 148

UHNBC: Learning and Development Centre (LDC) 0505

 

 

Thursday July 6th, 2017 Agenda

8:00 – 8:30am Registration and Meet and Greet
8:30 – 8:45am Introduction, Recognition and  Acknowledgement of Territory
8:45 – 9:15am Introduction to Transformative Leadership & Practice: Theoretical Framework
 

9:15 – 12:00pm

Child and Youth Health

9:15 – 10:00am Applying Transformative Leadership and Practice –
Dr. Gordie Hogg & Dr. Gord Miller
10:00 – 10:30am Wellness Break and Networking
10:30 – 11:30am Social Innovation and Policy Creation in Child and Youth Health –
Dr. Gordie Hogg, Ashley Frerichs & Dr. Gord Miller
11:30 – 12:00pm Summation Discussion and Evaluation of Topic
12:00 – 1:00pm Lunch and Networking
 

1:00 – 4:00pm

Indigenous Health

1:00 – 1:15pm Introduction to Indigenous Health –
Roberta Price, Elder, Snueymuxw and Cowichan First Nation
1:15 – 2:30pm Transformative Leadership in Indigenous Health –
Leslie Bonshor, Aboriginal Health Executive Advisor
2:30 – 3:00pm Wellness Break and Networking
3:00 – 3:30pm Case Studies and Discussion Group
3:30 – 4:00pm Summation Discussion and Evaluation of Topic
4:00 – 4:30pm Day Debrief & Closing Remarks –
Shannon Turner, POVC, Executive Director of PHABC

 

 

 

 

Friday July 7, 2017 Agenda

8:30 – 8:35am Welcome and Acknowledgement of Territory
 

8:35 – 12:00pm

Immigrant and Refugee Health

8:35 – 9:15am Social Determinants of Health in Response to Rising Immigrant Population  –
Dr. Karen Kobayashi
9:15 – 10:00am Case Studies Discussion Group
10:00 – 10:30am Wellness Break and Networking
10:30 – 11:15am Refugee Settlement and Health Care Needs –
Sara Hosseina, Nurse Practitioner
11:15 – 12:00pm Case Studies Discussion Group
12:00 – 12:15pm Summation Discussion and Evaluation of Topic
12:15 – 1:00pm Lunch and Networking
 

1:00 – 4:15pm

Healthy Built Environments and Planetary Health

1:00 – 2:00pm Plan H – Victoria Barr, BC Healthy Communities
Regional Outcomes Monitoring –
Shannon Clarke, Capital Regional DistrictConversations for a One Planet Region –
Dr. Trevor Hancock, School of Public Health and Social Policy, UVic
2:00 – 2:30pm Questions and Discussion of Presentations
2:30 – 3:00pm Wellness Break and Networking
3:00 – 3:45pm Local Discussions
3:45 – 4:15pm Report back, Summation Discussion and Evaluation of Topic
4:15 – 4:30pm Summer School Summation & Closing Remarks –
Paola Ardilles, PHABC Past President, SFU