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Summer School 2017: Child and Youth Health

Facing a Changing World:

Transformative Leadership and Practice

 

Summer School 2017

 

 

The Public Health Association of BC’s 8th annual summer school is only a few days away. During the two day course we will show registrants, through four topic areas, how they can operationalize Transformative Leadership into practice and create innovative changes in the field of Public Health and beyond.

Over the next week we will be posting feature blogs of each topic session to give registrants and those who are on the fence an idea of what we will be talking about. We continue today with Child and Youth Health.

Registrations for summer school are open now and seats are limited! Click here to register!

 

Child and Youth Health

It is estimated that 10-20% of children and youth in Canada are affected by mental illness, and 3.2 million youth between the ages of 12 and 19 are at risk for developing depression (CMHA, 2017). The causes for such mental health issues are multifactorial, but socially innovative approaches offer promising results for mental illness prevention in Canada’s youth. At the 2017 Summer School, Dr. Gordie Hogg, Dr. Gord Miller and Ashley Frerichs will present work they have been involved in related to meaningful collaboration and engagement of children and youth in the examination of relevant issues.

 

Dr. Gordie Hogg is a recently retired Canadian politician who, among many other distinguished roles in government, has served as the BC Liberal Member of the Legislative Assembly (since 1997) and as the Minister of Children and Family Development. Prior to his election to the Legislative Assembly Gordie was a counsellor, probation officer and regional director for corrections. After completing his BA in sociology and psychology, and his master’s degree in psychology, Gordie completed his PhD in Public Policy Development in 2015 and was appointed SFU Adjunct Professor in criminology in 2016. He served on the White Rock city council for 20 years, for 10 of which he was mayor. He has been a board member on more than 15 committees and non-profit societies, including the Peace Arch Community Health Council and Peace Arch Hospital. Gordie has also been a foster parent and Little League coach.

 

Dr. Gord Miller is an adjunct professor within the University of Victoria School of Child and Youth Care, and he is a former Research Officer and Senior Policy Analyst with the Ministry of Health, and the Ministry for Children and Family Development. He has been involved in the provincial development and implementation of: Healthy Workplaces; Healthy Schools; Healthy Communities; Health Impact Assessment (HIA); Provincial Health Goals; Youth Agreements; Agreements with Youth Adults; Youth Safe House Standards; Child, Family and Community Services Act; and, Youth Policy Framework. Gord’s current research, as a Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada Research Fellow, centers around understanding how programs, organizations, and communities affect children and youth health, well-being and development. Gord is a recipient of the 2014 ‘Premier’s Award for Innovation’ for his work in the area of Youth Engagement and Collaborative Action Research within the Ministry of Children and Family Development.

 

Ashley Frerichs is a recent graduate of the University of Victoria after completing her bachelor’s degree in Child and Youth Care. Ashley began in the field as a youth co-researcher working on a youth engagement strategy and has since worked as a youth employment counselor, a drop-in centre coordinator and – most recently – a Youth Outreach Worker. She is also a member of the Provincial Director of Child Welfare Youth Advisory Council. Ashley currently works in Parksville supporting the young people of her community.

 

If you haven’t already, register for the 2017 Summer School now, where social innovation and policy creation approaches will be explored in relation to our most vulnerable young people.

Summer School 2017: Indigenous Health and Transformative Leadership

Facing a Changing World:

Transformative Leadership and Practice

 

Summer School 2017

 

 

The Public Health Association of BC’s 8th annual summer school is only a week away. During the two day course we will show registrants, through four topic areas, how they can operationalize Transformative Leadership into practice and create innovative changes in the field of Public Health and beyond.

Over the next week we will be posting feature blogs of each topic session to give registrants and those who are on the fence an idea of what we will be talking about. We begin today with Indigenous Health and what the team at Vancouver Coastal Health are doing to enact transformative change throughout the province.

Registrations for summer school are open now and seats are limited! Click here to register!

 

Indigenous Health and Transformative Leadership

 

Indigenous people throughout BC continue to face barriers, including racial discrimination, when accessing health services in all areas of the system and in both urban and rural settings. As a part of the 2017 Summer School curriculum Leslie Bonshor, of the Tzeachten First Nation, identifies why transformative change is pertinent for improving Indigenous Health and how the conditions for such change are promising in the context of the  Truth & Reconciliation Commission 94 Calls to Action and the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples Internationally.

 

Leslie leads the Vancouver Coastal Health Aboriginal Health Team, within the larger VCH system, to support and facilitate system-wide transformative change for the Indigenous Peoples of the Vancouver Coastal Region. Such transformative change is facilitated by a team of Indigenous health leaders who act as agents of change throughout the greater Public Health system. The team provides education and leadership to health professionals in order to reform services to be more culturally sensitive and responsive, and they encourage the development of concrete goals in a movement towards addressing the TRC’s 94 Calls to Action.

 

Through the view that all health departments and professionals have a role in improving Indigenous health and a responsibility to participate in the reconciliation movement in Canada, the VCH Aboriginal Health Team focuses on empowering non-Indigenous health providers to learn about Indigenous colonial history and move towards offering culturally sensitive care as allies themselves. Having allies throughout the health system helps the spread of social change and thus helps to meet the reconciliation and cultural safety goals established by the health authority.

 

Indigenous health work is, by definition, transformative. This transformative leadership must have an impact at all levels of a system from the ground up. Until an entire system has reached a common level of understanding on the complexity of determinants that impact Indigenous people’s health and their interaction with health services, we can not make an impact on bridging the health gap for this population or achieve the health reconciliation calls outlined in the TRC.

 

Join us at the 2017 Summer School so you too can learn your role in transforming Indigenous health.

Summer School 2017: Final Agenda Released

PHABC’s Summer School 2017

Facing a Changing World:

Transformative Leadership and Practice

 

With just over a week to go before our annual summer school we are delighted to share with you our agenda for both days. We are excited to bring together experts and innovators from all over BC to discuss this important leadership style and how registrants can apply the theory in their work and personal lives to effect positive changes in their communities.

If you haven’t registered be sure to do so soon, seats are filling up! Click here to register

 

Room Locations

UBC: Life Sciences Building (LSC) 1002 LT2

UVic: Medical Services Building (MSB) 160 LT

UBCO: Reichwald Health Sciences Centre (RHS) 148

UHNBC: Learning and Development Centre (LDC) 0505

 

 

Thursday July 6th, 2017 Agenda

8:00 – 8:30am Registration and Meet and Greet
8:30 – 8:45am Introduction, Recognition and  Acknowledgement of Territory
8:45 – 9:15am Introduction to Transformative Leadership & Practice: Theoretical Framework
 

9:15 – 12:00pm

Child and Youth Health

9:15 – 10:00am Applying Transformative Leadership and Practice –
Dr. Gordie Hogg & Dr. Gord Miller
10:00 – 10:30am Wellness Break and Networking
10:30 – 11:30am Social Innovation and Policy Creation in Child and Youth Health –
Dr. Gordie Hogg, Ashley Frerichs & Dr. Gord Miller
11:30 – 12:00pm Summation Discussion and Evaluation of Topic
12:00 – 1:00pm Lunch and Networking
 

1:00 – 4:00pm

Indigenous Health

1:00 – 1:15pm Introduction to Indigenous Health –
Roberta Price, Elder, Snueymuxw and Cowichan First Nation
1:15 – 2:30pm Transformative Leadership in Indigenous Health –
Leslie Bonshor, Aboriginal Health Executive Advisor
2:30 – 3:00pm Wellness Break and Networking
3:00 – 3:30pm Case Studies and Discussion Group
3:30 – 4:00pm Summation Discussion and Evaluation of Topic
4:00 – 4:30pm Day Debrief & Closing Remarks –
Shannon Turner, POVC, Executive Director of PHABC

 

 

 

 

Friday July 7, 2017 Agenda

8:30 – 8:35am Welcome and Acknowledgement of Territory
 

8:35 – 12:00pm

Immigrant and Refugee Health

8:35 – 9:15am Social Determinants of Health in Response to Rising Immigrant Population  –
Dr. Karen Kobayashi
9:15 – 10:00am Case Studies Discussion Group
10:00 – 10:30am Wellness Break and Networking
10:30 – 11:15am Refugee Settlement and Health Care Needs –
Sara Hosseina, Nurse Practitioner
11:15 – 12:00pm Case Studies Discussion Group
12:00 – 12:15pm Summation Discussion and Evaluation of Topic
12:15 – 1:00pm Lunch and Networking
 

1:00 – 4:15pm

Healthy Built Environments and Planetary Health

1:00 – 2:00pm Plan H – Victoria Barr, BC Healthy Communities
Regional Outcomes Monitoring –
Shannon Clarke, Capital Regional DistrictConversations for a One Planet Region –
Dr. Trevor Hancock, School of Public Health and Social Policy, UVic
2:00 – 2:30pm Questions and Discussion of Presentations
2:30 – 3:00pm Wellness Break and Networking
3:00 – 3:45pm Local Discussions
3:45 – 4:15pm Report back, Summation Discussion and Evaluation of Topic
4:15 – 4:30pm Summer School Summation & Closing Remarks –
Paola Ardilles, PHABC Past President, SFU

 

Summer School 2017: Topic Introductions

PHABC Summer School 2017

 

 

Facing a Changing World:
Transformative Leadership & Practice

 
With only 3 weeks left until our annual summer school, ‘Facing a Changing World: Transformative Leadership & Practice,’ we are pleased to share with you introductions to each topic we will be covering. We hope that you are as excited for the summer school as we are and hope to see you all at one of the four locations on July 6th and 7th! It’s not too late to register!

 

Child & Youth Care

BC Children and Youth are experiencing issues related to anxiety and mental health, and while the causes are multifactorial, there are socially innovative approaches that are being undertaken to try to address this. Dr. Gordie Hogg, Ashley Frerichs (youth co-researcher), and Dr. Gord Miller will be presenting work they have been involved in related to meaningful collaboration and engagement of children and youth in the examination of relevant issues. Social innovation and policy creation approaches will be explored related to our most vulnerable young people.

 

 

Indigenous Health

Diverse health concerns are ever present in the Indigenous communities of Canada; communities which are affected by all social determinants of health, as well as by a complex history of colonialism, racism, and residential schools. Leslie Bonshor, of the Tzeachten First Nation, and Elder Roberta Price, of the Snuneymuxw and Cowichan First Nations, have worked tirelessly for decades to provide leadership and raise awareness about these health issues concerning Indigenous peoples. They are devoted to creating positive social change and will explore how we can work together to improve the health and wellbeing of Indigenous communities.

 

 

Immigrant and Refugee Health

The increasing diversity of Canada’s immigrant and refugee populations raises important concerns regarding the health-related needs of these populations, particularly in the context of the challenges posed by the social, economic, geographical, cultural and environmental exigencies that accompany the process of migration. In this session, Dr. Karen Kobayashi and Sara Hosseina will be tackling issues regarding the health needs of immigrants and refugees in Canada.

 

 

Planetary Health – Healthy Built Environment

High-income countries are 80 – 90% urbanized and we spend 90% of our time indoors, so the built environment is by far the most common environment for humans in the 21st century; it needs to be health-enhancing. But we also spend 100% of our time living within the natural ecosystems that are the ultimate determinants of our health. Thus the built and natural environments are of vital concern, and yet we have not been doing a great job at creating healthy environments in recent decades. It is clear that we need to transform the way we live within and manage these environments in the 21st century. In this session, Victoria Barr, Shannon Clarke and Trevor Hancock will explore three innovative BC-based approaches to managing the built environment in holistic ways that will create better health and greater ecological sustainability.

We hope you will join us for two unforgettable days of presentations and discussions with industry leaders and innovators.

Click here to register now!

Transformative Leadership and Practice: What is it and why does it matter?

Facing a Changing World:

Transformative Leadership and Practice

 

Summer School 2017

 

 

The Public Health Association of BC’s 8th annual summer school is fast approaching. This year’s school will take place on July 6 & 7, 2017 at the University of British Columbia, University of Victoria, University of British Columbia Okanagan, and University of Northern British Columbia. Our overarching theme for this year is Transformative Leadership and Practice and over the two day program we will dissect what Transformative Leadership and Practice means and how it can be operationalized to create innovation in Public Health. Registrations are open now and we encourage everyone to sign up early as space is limited! Click here to register!

 

 

What is Transformative Leadership and Practice?

Transformative Leadership is an alternative model of leadership which focuses on instilling inspiration, motivation and intellectual stimulation. Transformative Practice is the applied model derived from the theory of Transformative Leadership and works to align an individual’s values to the team’s through creating a bottom-up system where communication is not only required – it is encouraged. The Transformative Leadership approach gives governing bodies the tools to inspire populations to become conscious of their own needs and values while also learning to look beyond self interest. It is holistic in the sense that it encourages individual group members to identify with whole group values.

 

 

Why Does it Matter?

Several studies have indicated that Transformative Leadership promises to be a highly effective leadership style as it focuses on an individual, team and organization’s performance through bottom-up processes rather than top-down. Literature suggests that Transformative Leadership behaviours can increase an individuals job satisfaction and commitment to an organization by instilling power to create innovation throughout the organizational hierarchy, instead of focusing it at the top.

 

 

What Will You Learn?

In our Summer School, we will explore evidence based methods and several case studies on the effectiveness and the diverse applications of Transformative Leadership and how it can be applied in practice across these Public Health topics; Child and Youth Health, Indigenous Health, Planetary Healthy and Healthy Built Environments, and Immigrant and Refugee Health. Through discussions surrounding the applications of Transformative Leadership in Public Health, we aim to show how a more comprehensive model for guiding change could be established by complementing the facets of Transformative Leadership with the components outlined in a collective impact framework. There will be key-note presenters and a chance to evaluate the case studies presented through a strong focus on discussion, collaboration and creating innovative solutions. We hope to see you there!

 

 

 

 

The Summer School will run from 8:00am-4:00pm on July 6, and 8:30am-4:30pm on July 7th at four locations around BC.

 

Registration is currently open and can be found here.

Raising the Profile of the Community-Based Seniors’ Services Sector in B.C

Raising the Profile of the Community-Based Seniors’ Services Sector in B.C.:

A Review of the Literature

 

 

In B.C. our population is aging, and Statistics Canada estimates that by 2038 approximately 1/4 of British Columbians will be seniors. At the forefront of providing services to our aging population are municipal and non-profit community-based seniors’ services, which provide a range of low-barrier programs and services to seniors in the core areas of nutritional supports; health and wellness; physical activity; educational, cultural and recreational programs; information, referral, and advocacy; transportation; and affordable housing. Community-based seniors’ services play a critical role in supporting seniors to age in place by helping them to remain physically active, socially engaged, and as healthy and independent as possible. Yet there is a limited recognition of the important role played by the community-based seniors’ services sector in the broader community and by government, and limited Canadian research on the contribution this sector makes in supporting seniors to age well.

 

 

The Raising the Profile Project is an independent project led  by seniors and an Advisory Committee representing non-profits and municipalities across the province. The project’s goals are to raise the profile of community-based seniors’ services, identify the funding and service gaps, build the case for investing in these services, and make recommendations about how  to build the long-term capacity of the sector to meet the rising needs of seniors in B.C.

 

 

The report Raising the Profile of the Community-Based Seniors’ Services Sector in B.C.: A Review of the Literature outlines frameworks for understanding the role of the community-based seniors’ services sector in B.C. and brings together considerable  evidence showing that the health promotion and prevention programming offered by the sector can foster resilience,  and result in significant improvements in seniors’ health.  In particular, it highlights nutrition, physical activity, and social support as three key areas in which community-based seniors’ services may substantially impact the health and well-being of seniors and reduce the use and cost of healthcare services.

 

 

You can find the full report here:

http://www.seniorsraisingtheprofile.ca/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/RPP-Literature-Review.pdf